Essential skills for employment

Universities and colleges around the globe are turning on to the post-graduate value to students of including critical thinking studies in the curriculum. Employers increasingly recognize the worth of having critical thinkers on their teams. In the U.S., the annual Department of Labor workforce research consistently lists critical thinking skills among those in highest demand by employers.

A 2016 report in Australia found that job seekers starting out in their careers can expect to earn over $7500 more if they have recognized problem solving skills. The same report demonstrated an increase of 158% in jobs requiring critical thinking skills.

Institutions are starting to recognize these trends and there are a growing number that are including Kepner-Tregoe in study programs like the MBA. If your education institution does not offer you this option, maybe you should be asking why not.

The 2016 report demonstrated 158% growth in jobs requiring critical thinking skills

One organization that recognizes the importance of this field of study is the Neeley School of Business at TCU (Texas Christian University, Dallas). TCU notes that being able to include Kepner-Tregoe critical thinking skills on their resumes immediately gives Neeley MBA graduates an advantage in the employment stakes.

MBA graduates with well-developed critical thinking abilities are able to marry their qualitative and quantitative skillsets. They bring with them valuable skills in fact-finding, data analysis, effective communication, motivation and team-building techniques. These are skills that are not always sufficiently covered in other areas of the MBA curriculum.

Students learn how to assess the value of their ‘gut instincts’, using established techniques that make it possible to analyze theories and prove or disprove them quickly.

The KT problem solving methodology, which has been proven in business, is increasingly recognized on campus as businesses choose graduates with Kepner-Tregoe skills. Neeley graduates report that they are often questioned on their KT problem solving skills during interviews, and that these skills are seen as “highly valuable” by employers.

KT has a powerful toolkit to improve critical thinking

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